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Oblate Academy

Welcome to Oblate Academy!

Early introduction to key virtues is an important step in helping a child begin to develop a virtuous and purposeful life.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church tells us:

A virtue is a firm attitude to do what is right. Its direct opposite is a vice. A vice is a habit to do what is wrong. Prudence, justice, fortitude and temperance are called the human or cardinal virtues because they forge our human character. These four habits assist us in developing a pure heart that is open to God’s will.

“The moral virtues grow through education, deliberate acts and perseverance in struggle. Divine grace (God’s special help that strengthens us) purifies and elevates the virtues in our lives.”
Catechism of the Catholic Church #1839

We have prepared some materials to help children of every age (and parents too!) understand and practice virtuous living. I hope they will be a useful tool for you as you raise our young brothers and sisters in Christ!

Fr. David P. Uribe, OMI


 

This Month’s Virtue is: Responsibility

“Train the young in a way they should go; even when old, they will not swerve from it”. (Proverbs 22:6)

Teaching Tips:

  • Explain to your child the meaning of responsibility. Responsibility means being dependable, making good choices, and taking accountability for your actions. It means doing the right thing before we are asked.
  • Teach your child that we are responsible for our time, energy, talents, gifts, minds and spirits, and that we should invest in nothing that does not in some way contribute to the work of the Lord. Sometimes we can get confused and choose whatever feels good at the time, not paying attention to the consequences. We should be careful and make sure that our choices are not driven by our own selfishness.
  • Explain to your child that the choices they make impact others including their family, friends, classmates, and teachers.
  • Being responsible at home means to complete our daily chores. If they are responsible for feeding the dog and they forget, they are not being responsible. Ask your child: What will happen if the dog doesn’t get fed? Then explain to your child that responsibility means being dependable. Tell them that the dog depends on them for food.
  • Teaching your child to give service to others by volunteering is an act of responsibility. Ask them where they can make a difference in their community. Then take them to volunteer at church, a community center, a children’s shelter, foodbank, or pet shelter. God calls us to model the best behavior and show kindness and compassion to others.
  • Model behavior to your child and explain examples where you are giving of your time and being responsible. Model giving away used clothing, food, or toys to the church or homeless shelter, or taking care of sick friend by checking on them and attending to any needs they might have.
  • Complete the My Responsibilities Worksheet with your child and place it in a place where you will see it often and keep track of how often they are meeting their responsibilities and plan a reward system for the number of times they meet and reminder system for times they forget

Extensions for 3rd -5th grades

 


 

Welcome to Oblate Academy!

Exposing our children to stories of the Saints is important for their faith development. The Saints are heroes of the faith! We are called to be like them and to live for Jesus.

I hope you will enjoy the story of St. Henry II and have the same passion for spreading the Gospel that he did!

Much like St. Henry II, my brother Missionary Oblates travel far and wide to bring Jesus’ love to the poorest and most abandoned throughout the world.

 

Saint of the Month for May,
St. Henry II

He indeed died for all, so that those who live might no longer live for themselves but for him who for their sake died and was raised.” (2 Corinthians 5:15)

Saint Henry II Coloring Sheet Henry was born in May 973, the son of Duke Henry II of Bavaria and Gisela of Burgundy. His father came into conflict with his cousin, the Holy Roman Emperor Otto, and was exiled. During his father’s exile, young Henry lived in Hildesheim. Henry was educated in Christian faith by Bishop Wolfgang Regensburg. Bishop’s teachings on charity left a big impression with Henry. He was and dedicated to his studies and for a short time was considered for the priesthood. But when Henry was thirteen years old, his father died and he was elected by the Bavarian nobles as the new duke to succeed his father. In 999, Henry married Cunigunde of Luxembourg. The church supported him becoming King of Germany, and he was crowned in 1002.

As king, Henry encouraged the church to reform its practices and follow canon law. Henry worked to be a good and just king. He brought a peaceful end to revolt in his territory and pardoned the people rebelling.

In 1014, Pope Benedict VIII crowned him as head of the Holy Roman Empire. Henry II spent the next several years consolidating his power within his borders. Henry faced political turmoil and was not always seen as the rightful ruler. However, after military successes, much of the Italian clergy and some noble families swore allegiance to him. Henry returned to Germany and made his journey a pilgrimage, stopping at different monasteries along the way. Henry was patron of churches and monasteries. Henry was also very concerned for the poor, making large donations to help the poor and needy.

In the last years of his life, Henry was afflicted with a grave illness that crippled his leg. But this did not stop him from spending a great amount of time in prayer. At one point, he considered leaving his duties to become a monk. St. Henry II died in July of 1024. He was canonized in 1146. His feast day is July 13.

St. Henry II Prayer for Students

St. Henry II, please be my friend.
Help me to be like you and practice charity with others and share the gifts God has given me every day.
Pray for me so I might serve the poor and others in their time of need.
St. Henry II, pray for us!

Download the activity sheet and please send me your prayer requests and petitions in the form below!

Petitions - Virtue
Your partnership with the Missionary Oblates is greatly appreciated. We would like to occasionally send you updates about our ministries, which will explain how you are blessing the poor and needy in our missions.